Research

Justice and Conflict Dynamics

Overview

What determines whether conflicts over injustice and oppression move in a constructive or destructive direction?

Justice is an important foundation for interpersonal and inter-group relations.  It tempers self-interest, promotes the emergence of social norms, and can generate cooperative and altruistic behavior.  But justice is often in “the eye of the beholder,” and this subjectivity can serve to intensify rather than mitigate conflict under some circumstances.  Prior research on social justice has identified important differences between distributive, procedural, retributive and reparative types of (in)justice as primary motivators of conflict and peace. However, most conceptualizations and empirical studies of these motives have been short-term, piecemeal and static.

This research area attempts to understand the interactive and temporal dynamics of justice motives of patterns of conflict and peace aims to address a basic question: what determines whether conflicts over injustice and oppression move in a constructive or destructive direction?

Theory

Current Research

Practice

Publications

Justice and Conflict
In The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition
By Morton Deutsch (forthcoming)
A Framework for Thinking About Oppression and Its Change
In Social Justice Research, Volume 19
By Morton Deutsch (2006)
Distributive Justice
By Morton Deutsch (1985)
Social Justice: History, Theory and Research
In Susan T. Fiske, Daniel T. Gilbert, Gardner Lindzey (Eds.) Handbook of Social Psychology
By John T. Jost Ph.D. & Aaron C. Kay Ph.D (2010)

Education

Communications

Network

Back to top